IPB Style© Fisana

Jump to content



Please donate to gain access to The Bedlam, an ad-free version of the board and more!


Photo

RIP Scott Weiland


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#21 Kenticus69

Kenticus69

    Ouroboros

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2842 posts
  • Joined 21-June 05

Posted 10 December 2015 - 01:16 AM

Yeah, I thought the ex-wife's statement was in poor taste. I can understand she is bitter and that Scott Weiland was a shitty dad, etc... But dude was sick. She showed a complete lack of class and proved herself to be a shitty person as well.


He wasn't sick - he was an addict, big difference. Calling it only a sickness is too simplistic, the dude had an addictive personality and had every opportunity to clean up and didn't, that simple. He even admitted to picking drinking back up, as though that's no big deal.....dude if you had a smack addiction and cleaned up, even grabbing a bottle of booze is a bad step, it leads back to smack in that case. Yes, the dude was sick, but a lot of it was his own doing.

We as a society can't refer to drug addiction as a sickness....part of it is a sickness because your body becomes dependent and yes some people are genetically predisposed to addiction, but there is certainly certainly an element of choice involved and Scott chose to do drugs and screw up his life. She is right in that respect, love her or hate her, she's right that at a certain point he made a choice. And that's why you can celebrate the music, but never ever celebrate the person and their "struggle" with drugs, by all accounts it wasn't a struggle, it's what he wanted t do.

#22 xpgno

xpgno

    Goliath

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4693 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10

Posted 10 December 2015 - 01:53 AM

Yeah his wife probably caught unending shitstorms of grief and pain due to the reckless decision-making of Mr. Rock Star. Calling her a shitty person for taking the one opportunity presented to air her grievances in what was probably decades of being fucked over again and again sorta leaves a sour taste in the mouth.



#23 scorpio

scorpio

    Custom Rank

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5142 posts
  • Joined 13-June 05
  • Gender:Female

Posted 10 December 2015 - 02:02 AM

She chose that man.

It's my opinion. The man was barely cold. Not a class act.

#24 xpgno

xpgno

    Goliath

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4693 posts
  • Joined 08-April 10

Posted 10 December 2015 - 02:25 AM

I mean I fully understand that "you can't make an omelette without breaking some eggs," but in this case, one must ask -- where's the omelette? Miles Davis' ex-wife probably could have written the same letter about Miles, but it wouldn't necessarily have been warranted because of his accomplishments. In the case of Scott Weiland, however, the balance between "making art" and "fucking up" tips wayyy in favor of fucking up.

 

In my opinion, abandoning children is an unforgivable sin that can sometimes be mitigated by great achievements, achievements that Weiland didn't come close to. Do I think we should crucify him as the anti-christ? Not really, no, I just think it's an interesting opportunity to have this discussion.



#25 Bane Fubar

Bane Fubar

    Twat.

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32781 posts
  • Joined 16-February 07
  • Gender:Male

Posted 10 December 2015 - 03:14 AM

Well the best thing Kurt Cobain did for his daughter was just end it all on top and leave a giant cash cow to Courtney.

 

Sounds like Weiland blew all his money on drugs and left his family with nothing. She probably gets a small check for album sales every quarter but based on album sales, I doubt it's substantial. And knowing the status of record companies they have that shit probably tied up in court for years now.

 

Just to show how much she doesn't care about people spending money on anything remembering Weiland, she even says spend it on taking a kid to a ballgame. She can't outright say "Don't buy any STP stuff" because that screws up the DeLeos and Eric.



#26 scorpio

scorpio

    Custom Rank

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5142 posts
  • Joined 13-June 05
  • Gender:Female

Posted 10 December 2015 - 04:17 AM

I feel that people become and stay addicts because they are broken people. There is a hole in the soul that can never be filled with drugs and or alcohol try as one might. It's a slow slow suicide, yes painful and exasperating to family members and something that I can never understand. I think these people are mentally ill in some way, the self hatred and self sabotaging examples of someone sick and in pain. I don't understand why they can't stay clean. I don't understand why loved ones and children aren't enough of an impetus. I know you can't love someone well from a spiritual sickness. No one should cast stones as we are all sinners. The wife hooked up with a drug addict and then seemed surprised that he remained a drug addict. Don't hook up with a broken person and expect them to work properly or to become fixed by love and family. It just doesn't work that way for some people is all I'm saying. That's what I mean by saying he was sick.

Ps I am not nor ever have been a fan. I like a few of his songs ok. I have no real clue about Scott Weiland or his life other than he was someone who struggled with demons and lost the fight. God bless him. God bless his children.

#27 Ghost Of Shark Horse

Ghost Of Shark Horse

    Tremulant

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1624 posts
  • Joined 15-June 15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK

Posted 10 December 2015 - 12:20 PM

I feel that people become and stay addicts because they are broken people. There is a hole in the soul that can never be filled with drugs and or alcohol try as one might. It's a slow slow suicide, yes painful and exasperating to family members and something that I can never understand. I think these people are mentally ill in some way, the self hatred and self sabotaging examples of someone sick and in pain. I don't understand why they can't stay clean. I don't understand why loved ones and children aren't enough of an impetus. I know you can't love someone well from a spiritual sickness. No one should cast stones as we are all sinners. The wife hooked up with a drug addict and then seemed surprised that he remained a drug addict. Don't hook up with a broken person and expect them to work properly or to become fixed by love and family. It just doesn't work that way for some people is all I'm saying. That's what I mean by saying he was sick.

Ps I am not nor ever have been a fan. I like a few of his songs ok. I have no real clue about Scott Weiland or his life other than he was someone who struggled with demons and lost the fight. God bless him. God bless his children.

 

In Buddhism that's described as being in The Realm Of Hungry Ghosts. Gabor Matè has written a great book about addiction is a result of trauma in childhood and needs to be treated with compassion rather than hostility etc.

I think what his wife said goes some way to show the hurt his actions/absence caused. Doesn't seem like anybody 'won' there, really?!

 

I think "God" may have left the building some time ago, probably got his hands full giving AID's to children in Africa and flooding a Cumbrian village in the UK, just a few weeks before his son's birthday.



#28 dydux666

dydux666

    Eunuch Provocateur

  • Members
  • 43 posts
  • Joined 15-February 15

Posted 10 December 2015 - 11:35 PM

It might be off topic but whatever. Have any of you ever lived with an alcohol addict? I live in a country where drinking alcohol is a very important part of our culture, and there's this person that is very important for me and i can see he's clearly an alcohol addict. So everyone around is like "it is what it is, whatever", he says it's all ok and he says he's getting better but it is so clear to me that he's just like falling apart. And i'm asking if any of you ever witnessed something like that, because i have a big problem here, i think about it all the time. "Is he worth all this effort?" or something like "Maybe i should leave him and let him die slowly"



#29 Dandelion

Dandelion

    nope

  • Party Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13867 posts
  • Joined 26-April 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buenos Aires, Argentina

Posted 11 December 2015 - 12:50 AM

addictions are hard to overcome, even with the best of treatments.



#30 temporal lob

temporal lob

    Miranda

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 300 posts
  • Joined 02-September 13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CT

Posted 11 December 2015 - 12:59 AM

I have a friend, who ironicly is also named Scott. He and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He is one of the smartest people I have ever met. He was accepted to Johns Hopkins University. But his addictions, starting with alcohol, and going downhill to Herion, have destroyed his life. He has been to rehab many times but falls back into old habits upon release everytime. He is at this point beyond help. If an addict doesn't truely want to get better, they wont be able to. It is up to them to find a reason to live well in the end. You can support , but you can't put the burden of their poor decisions on yourself.

#31 SnkZato1 Ph.D.

SnkZato1 Ph.D.

    Modtourniquet

  • Party Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5939 posts
  • Joined 29-November 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:www.riffandrock.com
  • Interests:Ask me about prison.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Posted 11 December 2015 - 03:53 AM

I have a friend, who ironicly is also named Scott. He and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He is one of the smartest people I have ever met. He was accepted to Johns Hopkins University. But his addictions, starting with alcohol, and going downhill to Herion, have destroyed his life. He has been to rehab many times but falls back into old habits upon release everytime. He is at this point beyond help. If an addict doesn't truely want to get better, they wont be able to. It is up to them to find a reason to live well in the end. You can support , but you can't put the burden of their poor decisions on yourself.

sure, but even if they want to recover it can be quite difficult.  Lot of research shows a lot of factors contribute to sobriety and also to relapse.  Its a complicated matter.  



#32 Kenticus69

Kenticus69

    Ouroboros

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2842 posts
  • Joined 21-June 05

Posted 11 December 2015 - 07:27 AM

 

I have a friend, who ironicly is also named Scott. He and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He is one of the smartest people I have ever met. He was accepted to Johns Hopkins University. But his addictions, starting with alcohol, and going downhill to Herion, have destroyed his life. He has been to rehab many times but falls back into old habits upon release everytime. He is at this point beyond help. If an addict doesn't truely want to get better, they wont be able to. It is up to them to find a reason to live well in the end. You can support , but you can't put the burden of their poor decisions on yourself.

sure, but even if they want to recover it can be quite difficult.  Lot of research shows a lot of factors contribute to sobriety and also to relapse.  Its a complicated matter.  

 

 

http://www.billboard...white-substance

 

and shockingly he was found with a pile of drugs in his room.  yes, there are a lot of things that go into addiction and sobriety and relapse, but at the end of the day, no one forces you to buy a ton of drugs and get loaded on them.  The thing with addictive personalities, is that, channelled properly it can be healthy, for example if you're an addictive person you might transfer your drug addiction into running or mountain biking or martial arts - things that done properly and with the right amount of effort can and do get you just as high if not higher than a bunch of narcotics.  Look at guys like Duff McKagen, guy was a huge addict to everything under the sun, channelled that into diving into books and getting educated and martial arts and overcame it.  Yes, there's a ton of this stuff that's due to genetics and such, but genetics don't predispose you to HEROIN, they predispose you to an addictive personality - it's how you act on that personality that matters.  and in scott's case it's clear: he didn't want nor care to get better.  if you want to do it, you go do it, simple as that.



#33 SnkZato1 Ph.D.

SnkZato1 Ph.D.

    Modtourniquet

  • Party Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5939 posts
  • Joined 29-November 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:www.riffandrock.com
  • Interests:Ask me about prison.
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Posted 11 December 2015 - 03:44 PM

 

 

I have a friend, who ironicly is also named Scott. He and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He is one of the smartest people I have ever met. He was accepted to Johns Hopkins University. But his addictions, starting with alcohol, and going downhill to Herion, have destroyed his life. He has been to rehab many times but falls back into old habits upon release everytime. He is at this point beyond help. If an addict doesn't truely want to get better, they wont be able to. It is up to them to find a reason to live well in the end. You can support , but you can't put the burden of their poor decisions on yourself.

sure, but even if they want to recover it can be quite difficult.  Lot of research shows a lot of factors contribute to sobriety and also to relapse.  Its a complicated matter.  

 

 

http://www.billboard...white-substance

 

and shockingly he was found with a pile of drugs in his room.  yes, there are a lot of things that go into addiction and sobriety and relapse, but at the end of the day, no one forces you to buy a ton of drugs and get loaded on them.  The thing with addictive personalities, is that, channelled properly it can be healthy, for example if you're an addictive person you might transfer your drug addiction into running or mountain biking or martial arts - things that done properly and with the right amount of effort can and do get you just as high if not higher than a bunch of narcotics.  Look at guys like Duff McKagen, guy was a huge addict to everything under the sun, channelled that into diving into books and getting educated and martial arts and overcame it.  Yes, there's a ton of this stuff that's due to genetics and such, but genetics don't predispose you to HEROIN, they predispose you to an addictive personality - it's how you act on that personality that matters.  and in scott's case it's clear: he didn't want nor care to get better.  if you want to do it, you go do it, simple as that.

 

I work with drug addicts a lot.  It's not that simple.  I'd say genetics is a rather small portion of it.  A lot of it is coping and/or escaping a chaotic life.  Lot of addicts don't have good coping skills, so when trouble hits them they don't handle it like we might.  Small things are huge issues.  Heroin is an amazingly effective oping tool. 

 

I'll save the essay for another day, but recovery is a complicated and challenging process.  Yes of course part of it is the desire to, but even with a desire its not easy.  

 

The link claims he was diagnosed with Bi-Polar as well.  I'd be really curious about that.  It's a commonly misdiagnosed disorder and the general public has a terrible idea of what it really is.  Now I'm just getting voyeuristic 



#34 scorpio

scorpio

    Custom Rank

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5142 posts
  • Joined 13-June 05
  • Gender:Female

Posted 11 December 2015 - 04:04 PM

I also do not believe the addict continues to use just because he likes to get high. I cannot picture the hard core long time drug abuser as getting much pleasure from the high itself, after years and years of using. It seems pretty grim, constantly scoring and setting up to use and then the crushing guilt, day after day.

But that's just me. People can view addicts any way they want.

#35 temporal lob

temporal lob

    Miranda

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 300 posts
  • Joined 02-September 13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CT

Posted 11 December 2015 - 04:56 PM

Alex, my wife also works in the field of mental health and addiction, so I understand exactly what you are saying. I was just trying to tell duddux666 not to feel they were responsible for anothers addiction. You have one of the most difficult jobs ever. People that don't see what you do will never understand the patience and dedication it takes. Bless you.

#36 Kenticus69

Kenticus69

    Ouroboros

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2842 posts
  • Joined 21-June 05

Posted 18 December 2015 - 08:10 PM

http://www.101wkqx.c...death-revealed/

Overdose....not shocked and don't feel bad for the guy. He was a junkie and there's nothing out there saying he was even remotely working with anyone on sober living....so piece it together and just another junkie idiot wasting his talent and life.

#37 patsyinclined

patsyinclined

    #StillNoAnswers

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9130 posts
  • Joined 28-December 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:suckland

Posted 18 December 2015 - 09:10 PM

Jeez Kent I hope no one close to you is an addict

#38 Kenticus69

Kenticus69

    Ouroboros

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2842 posts
  • Joined 21-June 05

Posted 18 December 2015 - 09:25 PM

Jeez Kent I hope no one close to you is an addict


I've had addicts in my family - just no one tolerated it. It's just how some people roll, I understand it's a bit cold but I've lost people in my life to addiction and my angle has always been if you care about getting loaded more than you care about yourself and the people around you, then good riddance. Sorry it's harsh, but that's how I feel there's a significant element of choice included in addiction in addition to all the other factors like genetic predisposition. It's the choice part that frustrates me because at some point the person decided to try drugs instead of living healthy. Life is such a precious gift and for people like this to piss it away bothers me immensely.

#39 SoWhatComesNow?

SoWhatComesNow?

    Transatlantic Foe

  • Coma Donor
  • PipPipPip
  • 646 posts
  • Joined 07-July 06
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Cydonia

Posted 20 December 2015 - 03:44 AM

Scott will definitely be missed by many.  STP was great, I listen to them a lot.  However, it was sad to see him in a recent video of The Wildabouts playing Vaseline; you could definitely tell something was wrong with Scott.  He's probably in a better place now.



#40 manstis1804

manstis1804

    Ouroboros

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2873 posts
  • Joined 25-January 05
  • Location:Cleveland, OH
  • Interests:Music: making it

Posted 11 January 2016 - 10:33 AM

 

 

I have a friend, who ironicly is also named Scott. He and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He is one of the smartest people I have ever met. He was accepted to Johns Hopkins University. But his addictions, starting with alcohol, and going downhill to Herion, have destroyed his life. He has been to rehab many times but falls back into old habits upon release everytime. He is at this point beyond help. If an addict doesn't truely want to get better, they wont be able to. It is up to them to find a reason to live well in the end. You can support , but you can't put the burden of their poor decisions on yourself.

sure, but even if they want to recover it can be quite difficult.  Lot of research shows a lot of factors contribute to sobriety and also to relapse.  Its a complicated matter.  

 

 

http://www.billboard...white-substance

 

and shockingly he was found with a pile of drugs in his room.  yes, there are a lot of things that go into addiction and sobriety and relapse, but at the end of the day, no one forces you to buy a ton of drugs and get loaded on them.  The thing with addictive personalities, is that, channelled properly it can be healthy, for example if you're an addictive person you might transfer your drug addiction into running or mountain biking or martial arts - things that done properly and with the right amount of effort can and do get you just as high if not higher than a bunch of narcotics.  Look at guys like Duff McKagen, guy was a huge addict to everything under the sun, channelled that into diving into books and getting educated and martial arts and overcame it.  Yes, there's a ton of this stuff that's due to genetics and such, but genetics don't predispose you to HEROIN, they predispose you to an addictive personality - it's how you act on that personality that matters.  and in scott's case it's clear: he didn't want nor care to get better.  if you want to do it, you go do it, simple as that.

 

What a crock of shit.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users