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#21 Andrewf

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 07:32 AM

So how much footage has noizewater filmed and not shared because we haven't worshiped at the altar properly?

I heard he destroyed some JF footage just to piss everyone off but at the same time invited everyone to his house to watch the unreleased footage. He's crazy

#22 vacuumo

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 05:48 PM

please, enough with the hearsay and bad-mouthing. it doesn't do any of us any good.



#23 Ghost Of Shark Horse

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Posted 28 July 2019 - 06:52 PM

let's not make this thread a place for shit talking. for all of our sakes, please keep it civil.

 

AVV, thanks for digging that info up. 

 

Yeah, you're right. I shouldn't have posted that. 



#24 vacuumo

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 04:16 PM

no problem, and thanks.



#25 vacuumo

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Posted 30 July 2019 - 05:49 PM

the mario c session is 456132015

how do you know?



#26 A\/\/

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 02:43 AM

 

the mario c session is 456132015

how do you know?

 

 

from the album credits and the old bio on grandroyal.com

 

somehow the archive.org page doesn't work well for me, let me post the entire thing here

 

"Defacto…On four tracks of Pure Love" by Tick

 

Allow yourself to deconstruct with Defacto…

 

This story begins in El Paso, Texas. A place that is hardly a melting pot of Dub Music, but a town that three individuals collectively know as Defacto called home. Omar, Cedric, and Jeremy sat down on a Sunday afternoon with me and got Back to the Future, Michael J Fox, and got on some George Lucas looking backwards, starring in some prequel shit. As the band told me, they all had many other projects and groups that they worked on, but it is both fun and amazing how they can all step back and form Defacto. Jeremy lived in a punk house (they called it the "Dub House") near a mountain… the kid had a 4-track in late ’95 /’96. Then they started using a drum machine and this guitar tuner that sounded like a tuner that one would blow into, so they played the same chord over and over to sound like a melodica because they did not have one. They used a Alesis SR –16 drum machine, big gray old box that they started working on beats, then Ralph from Universal Recovered joined in and played on a couple of songs. They documented these mixes on 4-track and made tapes and they would give them to friends. Jeremy recalls how their songs were like 15 minutes long! Omar adds, "Then we started doing it with live drums. Jeremy had another house in Tucson, and we would drive out to Tucson, we would set up the drums, and the bass, and we would use like two mics, one for the snare and high hat, and one for the bass drum and bass cabinet, and that was it!" Cedric says, "That session is the FIRST record!" "It was put out on Jim’s label." That is actually Jim from At the Drive In’s label. So they did indeed record the Defacto album that fateful night in Tucson and released it as a 12" entitled "How you dub, you fight for dub, you plug dub in" on Headquarter Records, now known as Restart Records. Cedric says they still have 50 to 100 copies left.

 

It was actually based on that Tucson 4-Track Session that Defacto first realized that they should actual put something out. Cedric and Jeremy were actually working together on woodwork in Tucson, and Omar drove out with the drum kit, conga, and bass and just hung out for the week. They literally stayed up all night!

 

The name Defacto came from brainstorming one night and it was originally called Defacto Cadre’ Dub, and then it was shortened to Defacto. When asked what each member of Defacto was doing when they first started, Jeremy added "There were so many different projects and bands all the time, at one point we were all in one band…." Cedric chimed in and said, "Yeah actually we used to be called the Sphinktators, that was early Defacto, just more rock." Omar was actually the singer of the Sphinktators and remembers, "We used psychedelic sounds, Cedric played the bass, Jeremy played guitar, and Ralph played drums." Cedric adds, "I have another picture of an incarnation of Omar, Ralph, and I doing it once, at this party, we would set up a digital DD5 delay pedal, hook it up to drums, Ralph would play Farfisa, and Omar would play Bass."

 

Now after they put out the first release on Jim’s label, they did not get a chance to hook up and record again, because Omar and Cedric went off on tour with At the Drive In. Jeremy adds, "We did not see each other for awhile, because they were busy touring." Omar says, "It’s kind of like when we come home and have time off, we do this full on!"

 

It must be truly amazing and privileging to be a part of two bands with two different styles of music that virtually have nothing to do with each other yet share them same intense passion. When asked if Defacto was comfortable with the incarnation they have now, the band explained it would always be a metamorphosis. When they play in El Paso their friend Louie P comes out and plays percussion. Ikey who now plays keyboard with the band is an official member. The writing process is based on a lot of improv and what the band defines as "the spine," the drum and the bass. They say the "spine" is not even that rigid, because it is not a set pattern by any means. Omar adds, "It always switches up." They always look back at their old tracks and look forward to possibly finding remix work.

 

Interesting enough, the way the Sphinktators evolved into Defacto, as Cedric explains, "We were listening to Dub even back then, Jeremy always had records off the Shanachi Label…he always had the Yellow Man and the Prince Fari rockin." Jeremy adds, "Ross Michael and the Sons of Magus!" They would be playing Black Flag, then jump into a Prince Fari, and a King Crimson record! Omar cites as one of his favorite Dub Records, "King Tubby Rockers that Meets the rockers Uptown, the House of Dub, Linvolt Johnston, Winston Riley…etc.," Cedric adds, "August Pablo, Yellow Man, and Chef Boy Ardee…the chef is cookin’ up some mean dub!"

 

The early live gigs were interesting as the Sphinktators. They were about doing what they were told not to. Omar recalls that one gig they were playing a party for a GI’s house and "Cedric was in a mini skirt and a mask, he was in my baby borther's pajamas and panty hose, and it was just stuff like that, and we have this awesome picture of Jeremy…"

 

Now about to break it down by the different instruments. I asked if was difficult to switch modes to play in Defacto since it is so different from At the Drive In. Omar feels that it is a totally different instrument and it just goes, Cedric switches it up too since he is the drummer in this band and it’s a different formula, and with Jeremy, he seems to be the perfect way to round the team up, by adding so many wild sounds and vocals during the live show.

 

Once Defacto had a chance to Tour Europe! Omar and Cedric were in Europe touring and realized that on down time they could have Defacto shows…Jeremy flew to Europe and hooked up gigs on the most Punk Rock way Ever!! Half Way through this tour their friend Remy (the fabulous French Man) drove the van from Rotterdam and Remy had toured with other bands. Omar and Cedric would show up at their friends’ rehearsal spaces in abandoned buildings and they would play for the first time in Hamburg riding the bus there. "This was a total squatter house," Omar recalls, "piss everywhere, spray paint, huge space." Jeremy adds it was the first time they played in over a year. Cedric says that show they did not have drums and they were able to borrow drums. Omar even reminds us that they borrowed cars! In front of a show in Hamburg, these several German Punk kids offered Cedric a drum kit! Cedric was surprised and told the kids that they did not eve know him, but they said it was fine, and this was ALL DUE not to him being in At The Drive In, but as Cedric calls it a "Punk Rock Network." Cedric said people called friends trying to help Defacto find a drum kit…and it was all because they were part of a scene.

 

With Defacto both in Europe and the US, they have performed in front of a Punk Rock crowd. They took a risk of getting dissed by the PR kids, because they were not in front of their friends at a party, and their friends are very open-minded and into all kinds of music. They say, " With Defacto we have special dynamics, it’s so free form, and the name is so powerful and the attitude is very PUNK ROCK". The band brings a Punk Rock Ethic and Edge in a Dub Band. It does not matter to the band if they play in front of a Punk Rock kids or not, They do think it would be nice to play in front of PR kids because that audience is not familiar with this music. Jeremy feels that "we like it, maybe you will too!" Omar and Cedric add "It has its roots in it…it breaks the monotony" Omar adds, "It’s a rebellion, reggae is a rebellion." Cedric correlates and does not try to compare them to it but thinks of "The Clash, and you had like Johnny Rotten hanging out at the Rasta Clubs because he identified with the message of the music." Omar adds "Totally fucken raw and dirty"…Jeremy says "It’s pure feeling and gritty." They say that for them this form of music is almost a rebellion and they will be playing with Samiam and most of those kids at that show will not expect it at a show. "That’s what punk is, the choice, the diversity, the option to fill in the bubble that’s at ‘E: none of the above,’ maybe I’ll take this instead!" they explain. "We are still playing an underground setting and it’s punk. " This band takes risks to educate and have fun..

 

After Europe, Omar and Cedric came home, and Jeremy went back to El Paso. A few months later in December they all went into the studio, and Omar’s Father who plays traditional Salsa Music also joined in on a session. Omar’s Father sang and Salsa is what Omar grew up on! The studio was called Penny Lane and Gabe Gonzalez recorded them. The session was tight because they got to showcase their takes on their interpretation of Dub. They displayed influences from Fana and Vaya Record and all the New York 70’s Salsa. So for the first time they had a chance to incorporate all sounds…a percussionist known as El Professor added real solid percussion and layers of rhythm with Congas, Bongos, and Timbales. A horn player came in named David…and they all gelled well with the band. A very jazz approach to recording and all of these players were from Omar’s Father’s band. The New School meets the Old School! Omar’s Dad came in and he is very down to earth and the first thing he asked was for "fuel"…Beer. They joked and had fun! This shows how easy it was for the band to feel comfortable and not intimidated to play with more experienced musicians.

 

Ideally Defacto just wants to keep playing with their friends, and experimenting with more Afro Beat Type Rhythm…like a Fela Kuti record. All of these members did not take lessons on how to play any of these instruments. They just pick up instruments and mess with them! Cedric cites rhythmically he was inspired by Jimmy Hernandez (who played in Omar’s old band called Startled Calf) Omar yells, "I was 14!" Jimmy and Cedric started a band called Dragtones that evolved to when Jimmy went to school and learned how to play serious Latin and dub styles. Jimmy passed on from Cancer at 21 years old but brought so many flavors and showed the salsa progressions. With Omar’s father’s influence, and Jeremy’s record collection and influences, you have a well-influenced group. Jeremy’s friend played him Prince Fari, and he picked up a Fela record in Albuquerque. Defacto will bring new sounds to the fold, they all play Melodica, percussion and keyboards. Now with Ikey in the picture, (who was introduced to Omar by his friend Alexis), he had heard about Defacto from living in the same town of Long Beach. They met at this Hip Hop show, exchanged numbers and the very next day, Ikey called! That same day Defacto was asked to play a party, and Ikey showed up that day and jumped right into the Defacto set midway into it! It clicked! Jeremy, Omar, and Cedric, had been friends forever, and to add Ikey into the fold was a natural progression to continue the band further. Cedric thinks it would have been weirder had Ikey jammed with the band in private, but because he jumped in and plugged in, it left no doubt that Ikey was as smooth as silk.

 

Now in retrospect, the first Defacto show was on Christmas or New Years with just Cedric and Omar doing a lonely Dub Christmas! Some naysayers said, "What is this….AT THE DUB IN!" They were then convinced, after hearing the band and the enthusiasm showed through! Once during Thanksgiving, a stripped down version of Defacto played with just Omar and Cedric at a club called the Booby Trap House. Even back in the Sphinktators they would break into some deconstruction improv! There is even a comedy relief section that Jeremy reminds us during a live show…some Facts of Life, A-Team type shit.

 

Fast forward to now…A friend of the band made a CD of Defacto material for super producer Mario Caldato Jr., who actually knew nothing of At The Drive In. They all met for lunch, and Mario wanted to do some tracks, and they wanted to bring the El Professor down, but they ended up recording the more rootsy material. They recorded a new song in those Mario sessions (Vesica Pisces?), and cut and pasted parts. Omar and Mario shared tons of the same musical influences and the entire Defacto band just loved getting turned on to records by Mario and loved the atmosphere. Jeremy says that the MCJ sound studio was very warm, and they could have stayed there for weeks and never would have run out of instruments. Cedric recalls the keyboards and drum sounds. "Ikey got up on the Hammond B3 and all I can say is Ikey!" Omar and Cedric add, "If we record again, Ralph will come back again for sure…he is like Monty Python…he is like a Mexican Sun Ra!!" Ralph will play one to three notes and have a very magical look on his face! They re-recorded "120 East 7th Street," and on record they lifted an old Lee Perry lyric, but they dropped during the Mario session, it was the Soul Fire lyric and a good chant for the live show. They dropped the lyric because they did "Not want to bite after Master Perry."

 

Just some influence for Defacto…"Fela Kuti, Lee Perry, Fana live videos, Brainiac, Trenchmouth, The Eternals, Golden, and a band called Laddio Eollo Cko (who opened for Trans Am, and the Mexican Sun Ra. Ralph is also known as the RRR, standing for keep it real, recognize, and represent, the fourth r is silent for respect…the four Rs of Dub!)

 

The new album is tentatively called "Black Hot Chrome," to be released 2001 on Grand Royal Records. Omar wants a west coast stoner tour for San Francisco, Arcata, Ca, and Portland! It all does not have to be spikes for the audience, whoever wants to come out and dance! They leave us with this line… "You scared me, I thought the neighbors were doing dub!"

 

Most people would say for you to make Dub Music, it has to be roots, and this band is not taking any form of conformity and they are not insecure about doing it, they are just doing it. If you ever get a chance please join in the deconstruction of Defacto, it’s truly a liberating experience.

 

It seems like the Mario C session was the latest thing De Facto recorded by early 2001 and the description of the music fits to what was released on 456132015. They were obviously preparing to do more sessions with him, but who knows if they actually took place? Grand Royal went bankrupt like right around that time while Omar and Cedric started TMV. A fan emailed GR2 about it (I'm seeing now that it was actually you vacuumo, haha) and confirmed that the tapes were not "lost to the government". So if they purchased the recordings back, have been in control of them for a long time and were so excited about the collaboration with Mario C, why has it never been released or at least mentioned in later years?

 

Some more observations about the timeline:

It says that the session with Gabe Gonzales in El Paso with Omar's father etc. was in December after De Facto played shows in EU for the first time. Because the session was already discussed in the Buddyhead Interview in June 2000, it must have taken place in December of 1999 (after the RATM tour). Therefore the first De Facto EU tour alongside AtDI must have happened in spring of 1999. [Edit: Wrong, it was in 2000] Another session in El Paso w/ Gabe took place in March 2000, during which AMKHZ and the original 120E7 were recorded. Relationship Of Command was recorded right in between the two (7 weeks between January and March 2000). Megaton Shotblast booklet only says "2000", for both the El Paso recorded tracks, as well as the more experimental tracks recorded in Anikulapo. I assume "Medic Alert" was supposed to consist of the material recorded in El Paso with Gabe, which was later split up between Megaton Shotblast and Legende.

 

We don't know when 456132015 was exactly recorded. It was released on March 19th, 2001. Omar and Cedric left the country in mid January 2001. Here's a pic from the session, Omar looking very late-AtDI-ish.

 

De Facto recording timeline afaik:

 

- late 1995/96 unreleased 4-track recordings at the "Dub House" w/ Ralph Jasso and drum machine.

 

- June 1999, Jeremy's house in Tuscon aka. Pagaanroma:

Coaxial, Madagascar, Agua Mineral, De Facto, 1024 1/2, Thick Vinyl Plate, Drop, Radio Rebelde

 

- December 1999, Pennylane studios, El Paso (w/ Gabe Gonzales)

El Professor Contra De Facto, Fingertrap, Coaxial, Simian Cobblestone, Rodche Defects

 

(January 17th - March 9th, AtDI records ROC)

 

- March 2000, Pennylane Studios, El Paso (w/ Gabe Gonzales)

Amkhz, 120E7 (Original) (Simian Cobblestone sounds A LOT like these two, could be from the same session)

 

- 2000, Anikulapo, Long Beach

Legend Of The Four-Tailed Scorpion, Mattilious Creed, Muerte Inoxia, Cordova, Exit Template, Manual Dexterity, Mitchel Edward Klik, Nux Vomica/Coaxialreturn (December)

 

- before Jan 2001, MCJ Sound, Los Angeles (w/ Mario C)

120E7, Vesica Pisces

 

- March 2001 - EU tour

Vesica Pisces (Legende), Hoxadrine, Cordova (Megaton), Descarga De Facto, Thick Vinyl Plate (Megaton)



#27 vacuumo

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 04:54 AM

badass post, really excellent. i'm gonna have to chew on that a bit...



#28 swan_song1977

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 01:23 PM

the 96 stuff is news to me



#29 A.N.Other

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 05:50 PM

 

 

the mario c session is 456132015

how do you know?

 

 

from the album credits and the old bio on grandroyal.com

 

somehow the archive.org page doesn't work well for me, let me post the entire thing here

 

"Defacto…On four tracks of Pure Love" by Tick

 

Allow yourself to deconstruct with Defacto…

 

This story begins in El Paso, Texas. A place that is hardly a melting pot of Dub Music, but a town that three individuals collectively know as Defacto called home. Omar, Cedric, and Jeremy sat down on a Sunday afternoon with me and got Back to the Future, Michael J Fox, and got on some George Lucas looking backwards, starring in some prequel shit. As the band told me, they all had many other projects and groups that they worked on, but it is both fun and amazing how they can all step back and form Defacto. Jeremy lived in a punk house (they called it the "Dub House") near a mountain… the kid had a 4-track in late ’95 /’96. Then they started using a drum machine and this guitar tuner that sounded like a tuner that one would blow into, so they played the same chord over and over to sound like a melodica because they did not have one. They used a Alesis SR –16 drum machine, big gray old box that they started working on beats, then Ralph from Universal Recovered joined in and played on a couple of songs. They documented these mixes on 4-track and made tapes and they would give them to friends. Jeremy recalls how their songs were like 15 minutes long! Omar adds, "Then we started doing it with live drums. Jeremy had another house in Tucson, and we would drive out to Tucson, we would set up the drums, and the bass, and we would use like two mics, one for the snare and high hat, and one for the bass drum and bass cabinet, and that was it!" Cedric says, "That session is the FIRST record!" "It was put out on Jim’s label." That is actually Jim from At the Drive In’s label. So they did indeed record the Defacto album that fateful night in Tucson and released it as a 12" entitled "How you dub, you fight for dub, you plug dub in" on Headquarter Records, now known as Restart Records. Cedric says they still have 50 to 100 copies left.

 

It was actually based on that Tucson 4-Track Session that Defacto first realized that they should actual put something out. Cedric and Jeremy were actually working together on woodwork in Tucson, and Omar drove out with the drum kit, conga, and bass and just hung out for the week. They literally stayed up all night!

 

The name Defacto came from brainstorming one night and it was originally called Defacto Cadre’ Dub, and then it was shortened to Defacto. When asked what each member of Defacto was doing when they first started, Jeremy added "There were so many different projects and bands all the time, at one point we were all in one band…." Cedric chimed in and said, "Yeah actually we used to be called the Sphinktators, that was early Defacto, just more rock." Omar was actually the singer of the Sphinktators and remembers, "We used psychedelic sounds, Cedric played the bass, Jeremy played guitar, and Ralph played drums." Cedric adds, "I have another picture of an incarnation of Omar, Ralph, and I doing it once, at this party, we would set up a digital DD5 delay pedal, hook it up to drums, Ralph would play Farfisa, and Omar would play Bass."

 

Now after they put out the first release on Jim’s label, they did not get a chance to hook up and record again, because Omar and Cedric went off on tour with At the Drive In. Jeremy adds, "We did not see each other for awhile, because they were busy touring." Omar says, "It’s kind of like when we come home and have time off, we do this full on!"

 

It must be truly amazing and privileging to be a part of two bands with two different styles of music that virtually have nothing to do with each other yet share them same intense passion. When asked if Defacto was comfortable with the incarnation they have now, the band explained it would always be a metamorphosis. When they play in El Paso their friend Louie P comes out and plays percussion. Ikey who now plays keyboard with the band is an official member. The writing process is based on a lot of improv and what the band defines as "the spine," the drum and the bass. They say the "spine" is not even that rigid, because it is not a set pattern by any means. Omar adds, "It always switches up." They always look back at their old tracks and look forward to possibly finding remix work.

 

Interesting enough, the way the Sphinktators evolved into Defacto, as Cedric explains, "We were listening to Dub even back then, Jeremy always had records off the Shanachi Label…he always had the Yellow Man and the Prince Fari rockin." Jeremy adds, "Ross Michael and the Sons of Magus!" They would be playing Black Flag, then jump into a Prince Fari, and a King Crimson record! Omar cites as one of his favorite Dub Records, "King Tubby Rockers that Meets the rockers Uptown, the House of Dub, Linvolt Johnston, Winston Riley…etc.," Cedric adds, "August Pablo, Yellow Man, and Chef Boy Ardee…the chef is cookin’ up some mean dub!"

 

The early live gigs were interesting as the Sphinktators. They were about doing what they were told not to. Omar recalls that one gig they were playing a party for a GI’s house and "Cedric was in a mini skirt and a mask, he was in my baby borther's pajamas and panty hose, and it was just stuff like that, and we have this awesome picture of Jeremy…"

 

Now about to break it down by the different instruments. I asked if was difficult to switch modes to play in Defacto since it is so different from At the Drive In. Omar feels that it is a totally different instrument and it just goes, Cedric switches it up too since he is the drummer in this band and it’s a different formula, and with Jeremy, he seems to be the perfect way to round the team up, by adding so many wild sounds and vocals during the live show.

 

Once Defacto had a chance to Tour Europe! Omar and Cedric were in Europe touring and realized that on down time they could have Defacto shows…Jeremy flew to Europe and hooked up gigs on the most Punk Rock way Ever!! Half Way through this tour their friend Remy (the fabulous French Man) drove the van from Rotterdam and Remy had toured with other bands. Omar and Cedric would show up at their friends’ rehearsal spaces in abandoned buildings and they would play for the first time in Hamburg riding the bus there. "This was a total squatter house," Omar recalls, "piss everywhere, spray paint, huge space." Jeremy adds it was the first time they played in over a year. Cedric says that show they did not have drums and they were able to borrow drums. Omar even reminds us that they borrowed cars! In front of a show in Hamburg, these several German Punk kids offered Cedric a drum kit! Cedric was surprised and told the kids that they did not eve know him, but they said it was fine, and this was ALL DUE not to him being in At The Drive In, but as Cedric calls it a "Punk Rock Network." Cedric said people called friends trying to help Defacto find a drum kit…and it was all because they were part of a scene.

 

With Defacto both in Europe and the US, they have performed in front of a Punk Rock crowd. They took a risk of getting dissed by the PR kids, because they were not in front of their friends at a party, and their friends are very open-minded and into all kinds of music. They say, " With Defacto we have special dynamics, it’s so free form, and the name is so powerful and the attitude is very PUNK ROCK". The band brings a Punk Rock Ethic and Edge in a Dub Band. It does not matter to the band if they play in front of a Punk Rock kids or not, They do think it would be nice to play in front of PR kids because that audience is not familiar with this music. Jeremy feels that "we like it, maybe you will too!" Omar and Cedric add "It has its roots in it…it breaks the monotony" Omar adds, "It’s a rebellion, reggae is a rebellion." Cedric correlates and does not try to compare them to it but thinks of "The Clash, and you had like Johnny Rotten hanging out at the Rasta Clubs because he identified with the message of the music." Omar adds "Totally fucken raw and dirty"…Jeremy says "It’s pure feeling and gritty." They say that for them this form of music is almost a rebellion and they will be playing with Samiam and most of those kids at that show will not expect it at a show. "That’s what punk is, the choice, the diversity, the option to fill in the bubble that’s at ‘E: none of the above,’ maybe I’ll take this instead!" they explain. "We are still playing an underground setting and it’s punk. " This band takes risks to educate and have fun..

 

After Europe, Omar and Cedric came home, and Jeremy went back to El Paso. A few months later in December they all went into the studio, and Omar’s Father who plays traditional Salsa Music also joined in on a session. Omar’s Father sang and Salsa is what Omar grew up on! The studio was called Penny Lane and Gabe Gonzalez recorded them. The session was tight because they got to showcase their takes on their interpretation of Dub. They displayed influences from Fana and Vaya Record and all the New York 70’s Salsa. So for the first time they had a chance to incorporate all sounds…a percussionist known as El Professor added real solid percussion and layers of rhythm with Congas, Bongos, and Timbales. A horn player came in named David…and they all gelled well with the band. A very jazz approach to recording and all of these players were from Omar’s Father’s band. The New School meets the Old School! Omar’s Dad came in and he is very down to earth and the first thing he asked was for "fuel"…Beer. They joked and had fun! This shows how easy it was for the band to feel comfortable and not intimidated to play with more experienced musicians.

 

Ideally Defacto just wants to keep playing with their friends, and experimenting with more Afro Beat Type Rhythm…like a Fela Kuti record. All of these members did not take lessons on how to play any of these instruments. They just pick up instruments and mess with them! Cedric cites rhythmically he was inspired by Jimmy Hernandez (who played in Omar’s old band called Startled Calf) Omar yells, "I was 14!" Jimmy and Cedric started a band called Dragtones that evolved to when Jimmy went to school and learned how to play serious Latin and dub styles. Jimmy passed on from Cancer at 21 years old but brought so many flavors and showed the salsa progressions. With Omar’s father’s influence, and Jeremy’s record collection and influences, you have a well-influenced group. Jeremy’s friend played him Prince Fari, and he picked up a Fela record in Albuquerque. Defacto will bring new sounds to the fold, they all play Melodica, percussion and keyboards. Now with Ikey in the picture, (who was introduced to Omar by his friend Alexis), he had heard about Defacto from living in the same town of Long Beach. They met at this Hip Hop show, exchanged numbers and the very next day, Ikey called! That same day Defacto was asked to play a party, and Ikey showed up that day and jumped right into the Defacto set midway into it! It clicked! Jeremy, Omar, and Cedric, had been friends forever, and to add Ikey into the fold was a natural progression to continue the band further. Cedric thinks it would have been weirder had Ikey jammed with the band in private, but because he jumped in and plugged in, it left no doubt that Ikey was as smooth as silk.

 

Now in retrospect, the first Defacto show was on Christmas or New Years with just Cedric and Omar doing a lonely Dub Christmas! Some naysayers said, "What is this….AT THE DUB IN!" They were then convinced, after hearing the band and the enthusiasm showed through! Once during Thanksgiving, a stripped down version of Defacto played with just Omar and Cedric at a club called the Booby Trap House. Even back in the Sphinktators they would break into some deconstruction improv! There is even a comedy relief section that Jeremy reminds us during a live show…some Facts of Life, A-Team type shit.

 

Fast forward to now…A friend of the band made a CD of Defacto material for super producer Mario Caldato Jr., who actually knew nothing of At The Drive In. They all met for lunch, and Mario wanted to do some tracks, and they wanted to bring the El Professor down, but they ended up recording the more rootsy material. They recorded a new song in those Mario sessions (Vesica Pisces?), and cut and pasted parts. Omar and Mario shared tons of the same musical influences and the entire Defacto band just loved getting turned on to records by Mario and loved the atmosphere. Jeremy says that the MCJ sound studio was very warm, and they could have stayed there for weeks and never would have run out of instruments. Cedric recalls the keyboards and drum sounds. "Ikey got up on the Hammond B3 and all I can say is Ikey!" Omar and Cedric add, "If we record again, Ralph will come back again for sure…he is like Monty Python…he is like a Mexican Sun Ra!!" Ralph will play one to three notes and have a very magical look on his face! They re-recorded "120 East 7th Street," and on record they lifted an old Lee Perry lyric, but they dropped during the Mario session, it was the Soul Fire lyric and a good chant for the live show. They dropped the lyric because they did "Not want to bite after Master Perry."

 

Just some influence for Defacto…"Fela Kuti, Lee Perry, Fana live videos, Brainiac, Trenchmouth, The Eternals, Golden, and a band called Laddio Eollo Cko (who opened for Trans Am, and the Mexican Sun Ra. Ralph is also known as the RRR, standing for keep it real, recognize, and represent, the fourth r is silent for respect…the four Rs of Dub!)

 

The new album is tentatively called "Black Hot Chrome," to be released 2001 on Grand Royal Records. Omar wants a west coast stoner tour for San Francisco, Arcata, Ca, and Portland! It all does not have to be spikes for the audience, whoever wants to come out and dance! They leave us with this line… "You scared me, I thought the neighbors were doing dub!"

 

Most people would say for you to make Dub Music, it has to be roots, and this band is not taking any form of conformity and they are not insecure about doing it, they are just doing it. If you ever get a chance please join in the deconstruction of Defacto, it’s truly a liberating experience.

 

It seems like the Mario C session was the latest thing De Facto recorded by early 2001 and the description of the music fits to what was released on 456132015. They were obviously preparing to do more sessions with him, but who knows if they actually took place? Grand Royal went bankrupt like right around that time while Omar and Cedric started TMV. A fan emailed GR2 about it (I'm seeing now that it was actually you vacuumo, haha) and confirmed that the tapes were not "lost to the government". So if they purchased the recordings back, have been in control of them for a long time and were so excited about the collaboration with Mario C, why has it never been released or at least mentioned in later years?

 

Some more observations about the timeline:

It says that the session with Gabe Gonzales in El Paso with Omar's father etc. was in December after De Facto played shows in EU for the first time. Because the session was already discussed in the Buddyhead Interview in June 2000, it must have taken place in December of 1999 (after the RATM tour). Therefore the first De Facto EU tour alongside AtDI must have happened in spring of 1999. Another session in El Paso w/ Gabe took place in March 2000, during which AMKHZ and the original 120E7 were recorded. Relationship Of Command was recorded right in between the two (7 weeks between January and March 2000). Megaton Shotblast booklet only says "2000", for both the El Paso recorded tracks, as well as the more experimental tracks recorded in Anikulapo. I assume "Medic Alert" was supposed to consist of the material recorded in El Paso with Gabe, which was later split up between Megaton Shotblast and Legende.

 

We don't know when 456132015 was exactly recorded. It was released on March 19th, 2001. Omar and Cedric left the country in mid January 2001. Here's a pic from the session, Omar looking very late-AtDI-ish.

 

De Facto recording timeline afaik:

 

- late 1995/96 unreleased 4-track recordings at the "Dub House" w/ Ralph Jasso and drum machine.

 

- June 1999, Jeremy's house in Tuscon aka. Pagaanroma:

Coaxial, Madagascar, Agua Mineral, De Facto, 1024 1/2, Thick Vinyl Plate, Drop, Radio Rebelde

 

- December 1999, Pennylane studios, El Paso (w/ Gabe Gonzales)

El Professor Contra De Facto, Fingertrap, Coaxial, Simian Cobblestone, Rodche Defects

 

(January 17th - March 9th, AtDI records ROC)

 

- March 2000, Pennylane Studios, El Paso (w/ Gabe Gonzales)

Amkhz, 120E7 (Original) (Simian Cobblestone sounds A LOT like these two, could be from the same session)

 

- 2000, Anikulapo, Long Beach

Legend Of The Four-Tailed Scorpion, Mattilious Creed, Muerte Inoxia, Cordova, Exit Template, Manual Dexterity, Mitchel Edward Klik, Nux Vomica/Coaxialreturn (December)

 

- before Jan 2001, MCJ Sound, Los Angeles (w/ Mario C)

120E7, Vesica Pisces

 

- March 2001 - EU tour

Vesica Pisces (Legende), Hoxadrine, Cordova (Megaton), Descarga De Facto, Thick Vinyl Plate (Megaton)

 

:hs:



#30 A\/\/

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 02:42 PM

Trying to find more info.

 

Interview with Cedric, early 2001

4)So i hear you are doing another band right now,besides at the drive in. what's up with that?

CEDRIC: at current time omar and i are doing atdi and a band called defacto.defacto is 1000 percent jamaican influenced dub!it also leans heavily on the puerto rican 70s salsa vibe.much like the music of augustus pablo,lee perry,charlie palmeri,and king tubby,just to name some influence.the group is omar on bass,me on drums,jeremy ward(jims cousin)on vocoders,frequency analyzers and melodicas,and this kid who used to play with hr,named ikey owens on piano and other keys.we have a record on jims label called restart records......a record on golden standard laboratories(from san diego;home of the locust)a record from a french label called modern city records....and one coming out on grand royal...that will be produced by the man himself....mario caldato jr.we have only toured europe before 4 2 weeks with the get up kids(!)we are also going 2 cover 10 countries in 2 weeks at the begining of march 2001.

 

Still not clear if by the "one coming out on grand royal" he meant the EP, a planned record that was never finished, or a finished record that was never released.

He says the first De Facto euro tour was with The Get Up Kids. He posted a pic on his Instagram a while ago from a De Facto tour with The Get Up Kids / The Anniversary. I initially thought he meant shows in the US. But there was a euro tour in May/June 2000, one commenter on Insta posted "Saw you in Paris with tguk !". So they must have stayed in europe after the ATDI tour w/ Sunshine ended (April 30th) and hopped on a few of those shows before returning to California before May 17th (confirmed ATDI concert). Therefore the Grand Royal bio is wrong about the Medic Alert session happening after that tour. I should have noticed that earlier, because Omar says "we just did a tour in Europe" in that Buddyhead interview (June 2000).

 

http://rolodex.free.fr/newsus.htm

 

02/22/01: the De Facto album (ATDI's dub side-project formed in 1997 with Cedric and Omar plus Ikey Owens and Jeremy Ward (Jim's cousin)), produced by Mario Caldato Jr (Beastie Boys) will be released this year. A single titled 456 132 015 is scheduled at Grand Royal in march (europe) then in april (u.s.) with the songs 120 E7 and Vesica Pices.

 

03/06/01: according to theprp, De Facto's next album will be entitled "Black Hot Chrome" (a previously given name was "You Fight For Dub")

 

03/17/01: De Facto album will be released on GSL instead of Grand Royal
 

06/29/01: The new De Facto (Cedric and Omar's side-project) full-length album, Megaton Shotblast, will be released on July 24 on GSL. Announcing this new release in its newsletter, GSL has also confirmed that Cedric & Omar (ATDI & De Facto) and Ikey Owens & Jeremy Ward (De Facto) plays with 2 other guys in a band called Mars Volta. Mars Volta should play some shows in Europe in September, and they are said to prepare an LP on GSL.

 

08/31/01: The european "Defacto presents The Mars Volta" tour have been cancelled, it seems they have to stick around in California (thanks Genevieve).

 

09/12/01: GRAND ROYAL, RIP 1993-2001 Grand Royal (At The Drive-In, Beastie Boys, ...) is closed since August 31 due to financial problems. Click here to learn more.

Looks like a lot of information was mixed up during that time because of the amount of releases De Facto was putting out. "You Fight For Dub" was always the release on Restart. I still believe "Black Hot Chrome" was never fully recorded due to Grand Royal's demise (no more funding). Megaton Shotblast (containing Medic Alert sessions) was supposed to come out on GSL from the beginning, but the person running the website thought it was the same album.

 

TMV had a euro tour scheduled by June. I found Alex Newport's website, which had a finished Mars Volta EP listed in August of 2001. We have a picture from right after that session. Soooo... was that only that Roulette/Cicatrix demo? Or have they recorded more material with Blake? It's hard to tour on only two songs.



#31 Mataxia

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Posted 04 August 2019 - 05:12 PM

I remember reading a post on here a long time ago from someone claiming to know Alex Newport who said that Inertiatic and Caught in the Sun were also recorded during those sessions, but Roulette and Cicatriz were the only ones that saw the light of day.

#32 Andrewf

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 07:25 AM

Two other guys turned out to be a girl and a guy

#33 swan_song1977

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 01:52 PM

"defacto presents the mars volta" interesting



#34 SnkZato1 Ph.D.

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 06:54 PM

2001-2003 to me is one of the most interesting eras.  There is a general nebulous nature to what is happening as bands are existing in states of flux.  There is a bunch of stuff recorded in a short period, some of which we have, some of which we don't, and to add to that it is definitely not clear what was recorded that we haven't heard.  Unfortunately the fan base wasn't as big and strong enough to properly document so there is a lot of work to do still.  



#35 vacuumo

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 09:24 PM

 "De Facto present 'the Mars Volta'" holy crap. that's wild context for the band name.



#36 Andrewf

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 10:21 AM

I think first mars volta gigs were under de facto name even

#37 Andrewf

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 10:22 AM

ATDI presents De Facto
De Facto presents Mars Volta
Mars Volta presents Antemasque
Antemasque presents ATDI
ATDI presents Mars Volta

#38 A\/\/

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 11:55 AM

I reached out to Alex Newport and he replied!

 

He says the first session with Blake happend right after 9/11 and that he flew to LAX to work with TMV and it was eerily quiet and dead... which is weird, because Jon Theodore said he came to LA the day before 9/11. I will ask him again, maybe he mixed up two sessions.

 

More info:

 

- that first Volta session with Fleming was just those two "2001 demo" tracks. Roulette and Cicatriz ESP. Not more.

 

- A Manual Dexterity session happened "shortly after I think.. definitely not before. It was probably days after the TMV session, but at a different studio"

 

- I asked him if Absence stems from the same sessions as AMD: "No, I believe Omar did another session shortly after “A Manual Dexterity” at the same studio, but I was back in San Francisco working on something else at that point."

 

- He has no idea what happened with the "Black Hot Chrome" project.

And:

"I loved working with TMV and with Omar. He is an excellent musician, and he always set his goals about 15-20% above his ability (not that his ability wasn’t excellent, it was - he just wanted to push it even further, which I really appreciated) so there was a lot of hard work to get the tracks sounding how we wanted. The tracks for “2001 Demo” and Tremulant were all recorded to analog tape, very few studio has Pro Tools back then and I didn’t like the sound of it anyway at that point, so all the tracks were recorded analog, with some tape editing, and a lot of punch-ins to get all the guitar parts. There were a lot of tight live punch ins for the guitar parts, so both Omar and I had to be really on it to get the edits right.

I loved Blake’s drumming and thought he was an excellent drummer, but always had a feeling that his style maybe a bit too metronomic for TMV.. not quite fluid enough maybe. Ikey was incredible, Eva Gardner on bass was incredible, it was great to be able to work with the level of musicianship that they had. Cedric was always fun and hilarious to be around, always joking, but serious and worked hard when it came to vocals. And Jeremy Ward was the “sound manipulator” that would take Cedric’s vocals, and run them through pedals and a mixer and echo, usually live as Cedric was singing, and he was REALLY good at it and brought so much to the sound of the band, as well as being a truly wonderful person. They all were actually, and I have great memories of working and hanging out with them. I learned a lot from all of them.  On the 2001 demos, we were really still trying to figure out their sound, and it was still a bit undeveloped at that point, and didn’t really take shape fully until the Tremulant record. I spent a lot of time with them during that period, I lived in their place in Long Beach for a while where they rehearsed and we worked on developing their sound, and it was a great time."



#39 SnkZato1 Ph.D.

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 04:48 PM

I reached out to Alex Newport and he replied!

 

He says the first session with Blake happend right after 9/11 and that he flew to LAX to work with TMV and it was eerily quiet and dead... which is weird, because Jon Theodore said he came to LA the day before 9/11. I will ask him again, maybe he mixed up two sessions.

 

More info:

 

- that first Volta session with Fleming was just those two "2001 demo" tracks. Roulette and Cicatriz ESP. Not more.

 

- A Manual Dexterity session happened "shortly after I think.. definitely not before. It was probably days after the TMV session, but at a different studio"

 

- I asked him if Absence stems from the same sessions as AMD: "No, I believe Omar did another session shortly after “A Manual Dexterity” at the same studio, but I was back in San Francisco working on something else at that point."

 

- He has no idea what happened with the "Black Hot Chrome" project.

And:

"I loved working with TMV and with Omar. He is an excellent musician, and he always set his goals about 15-20% above his ability (not that his ability wasn’t excellent, it was - he just wanted to push it even further, which I really appreciated) so there was a lot of hard work to get the tracks sounding how we wanted. The tracks for “2001 Demo” and Tremulant were all recorded to analog tape, very few studio has Pro Tools back then and I didn’t like the sound of it anyway at that point, so all the tracks were recorded analog, with some tape editing, and a lot of punch-ins to get all the guitar parts. There were a lot of tight live punch ins for the guitar parts, so both Omar and I had to be really on it to get the edits right.

I loved Blake’s drumming and thought he was an excellent drummer, but always had a feeling that his style maybe a bit too metronomic for TMV.. not quite fluid enough maybe. Ikey was incredible, Eva Gardner on bass was incredible, it was great to be able to work with the level of musicianship that they had. Cedric was always fun and hilarious to be around, always joking, but serious and worked hard when it came to vocals. And Jeremy Ward was the “sound manipulator” that would take Cedric’s vocals, and run them through pedals and a mixer and echo, usually live as Cedric was singing, and he was REALLY good at it and brought so much to the sound of the band, as well as being a truly wonderful person. They all were actually, and I have great memories of working and hanging out with them. I learned a lot from all of them.  On the 2001 demos, we were really still trying to figure out their sound, and it was still a bit undeveloped at that point, and didn’t really take shape fully until the Tremulant record. I spent a lot of time with them during that period, I lived in their place in Long Beach for a while where they rehearsed and we worked on developing their sound, and it was a great time."

My only guess on the Blake/Theodore conundrum is that maybe they were testing both drummers out at the same time.  It could be true that Jon came out before 9/11 jammed then left and then Blake came after.  Just a guess.

 

Thanks for reaching out.  Helps to start put some clarity to the era.  



#40 A\/\/

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 07:25 AM

More from Alex:

 

- that session after 9/11 was Tremulant, the one with Blake was earlier, but Alex is not sure about the month.

- the 2001 Demo was recorded at Burbank, CA, and wasn't supposed to be a demo, but a proper release. It was recorded on analog tape and shelved after Blake was fired. Alex can't remember the name of the studio and believes it's not there anymore.

- Tremulant was recorded at The Compound in Long Beach (called Tone Collector at the time) and was supposed to be a demo, but they liked how it turned out and later decided to do a proper mix of it (at LAFX in Burbank on their API console). "I remember Omar asking why I was spending time working on the sounds just for a demo, and I commented that you never know what might happen to the tracks…"

- "AMD sessions were quite different from TMV sessions.. they were quicker, less complex. I had a lot less input on those sessions as Omar had a vision for what he wanted to do and was really the producer for those sessions, with me as engineer. I worked on maybe 3-5 songs over 2-3 days, and I didn’t do the mixing just the recording. I don’t think that record was mixed until years later."






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