IPB Style© Fisana

Jump to content



Please donate to gain access to The Bedlam, an ad-free version of the board and more!


Photo

MadlibA Comatorium Invazion


  • Please log in to reply
186 replies to this topic

#41 Guest_thirteenthsecond_*

Guest_thirteenthsecond_*
  • Guests
  • Joined --

Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:45 AM

WHY DON'T I LIKE HIP-HOP?


I don't know man, tell us.

#42 stickygreen

stickygreen

    Frances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1471 posts
  • Joined 22-August 05
  • Location:minnesota...texas born texas raised

Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:45 AM

Man, straight up fuck that. It's absurd that you guys can sit around demeaning my opinion of hiphop, while some of you seem to like an MC who perpetuates everything that is wrong in hiphop and rap. Paul Wall raps about money, bling, and "the game". That shit's ludicrous, writing songs about how expensive the grills are in your teeth is exactly the sort of shit I despise from rappers. for the mere fact that those sam diamonds are coming from African slave-labor, and any true MC, especially black ones would understand how fucke up the diamond trade is.

Talk about fucking generalizations, "All good rappers are black." "No white rapper has ever been good. Fact."

You guys are straight whack.


Paul Wall is everything that's wrong with hip hop? Not at all. In fact his album with Chamillionaire is widely regarded as a southern classic. Rapping about money IS hip-hop. To say that's whats wrong with it is saying rappers like Jay-Z are whats wrong with hip-hop, when in fact they rap about it exclusively. You prefer white rappers, your opinion on hip-hop couldn't be any more invalid. Go listen to some song by a white rapper about swallowing a bottle of vicadin because his cat died. That's not hip-hop.


Hahhah, and you cats were talking to me about ignorance and generalizations??

Awesome, an album he dropped with Chamiollionaire is considered a "southern classic". That's dope I guess if you're into, again, perpetuating a system bent on capitalism and making money. Rapping about money doesn't have to be what hiphop is about, and it's about fucking time that changed.

I'll regress from my previous points (such as yourself has done) to this: you're a douche.


No it doesnt, but it's one of the bigger aspects of hip-hop. Hip-hop is about proving how bad you are. It's been that way since it was invented. Being an emcee is about bragging about how good of a rapper you are. Bragging about how much money you make. How many bitches you get. How much weed you smoke, etc etc etc. If you can't respect that kind of rap, then maybe hip-hop isn't for you. Of course, I listen to concious rappers, political rappers, abstract rappers, but I'm not going to deny the huge influence and huge part of the culture that Paul Wall raps about. That's just stupid.

#43 Guest_thirteenthsecond_*

Guest_thirteenthsecond_*
  • Guests
  • Joined --

Posted 29 June 2006 - 08:58 AM

Man, straight up fuck that. It's absurd that you guys can sit around demeaning my opinion of hiphop, while some of you seem to like an MC who perpetuates everything that is wrong in hiphop and rap. Paul Wall raps about money, bling, and "the game". That shit's ludicrous, writing songs about how expensive the grills are in your teeth is exactly the sort of shit I despise from rappers. for the mere fact that those sam diamonds are coming from African slave-labor, and any true MC, especially black ones would understand how fucke up the diamond trade is.

Talk about fucking generalizations, "All good rappers are black." "No white rapper has ever been good. Fact."

You guys are straight whack.


Paul Wall is everything that's wrong with hip hop? Not at all. In fact his album with Chamillionaire is widely regarded as a southern classic. Rapping about money IS hip-hop. To say that's whats wrong with it is saying rappers like Jay-Z are whats wrong with hip-hop, when in fact they rap about it exclusively. You prefer white rappers, your opinion on hip-hop couldn't be any more invalid. Go listen to some song by a white rapper about swallowing a bottle of vicadin because his cat died. That's not hip-hop.


Hahhah, and you cats were talking to me about ignorance and generalizations??

Awesome, an album he dropped with Chamiollionaire is considered a "southern classic". That's dope I guess if you're into, again, perpetuating a system bent on capitalism and making money. Rapping about money doesn't have to be what hiphop is about, and it's about fucking time that changed.

I'll regress from my previous points (such as yourself has done) to this: you're a douche.


No it doesnt, but it's one of the bigger aspects of hip-hop. Hip-hop is about proving how bad you are. It's been that way since it was invented. Being an emcee is about bragging about how good of a rapper you are. Bragging about how much money you make. How many bitches you get. How much weed you smoke, etc etc etc. If you can't respect that kind of rap, then maybe hip-hop isn't for you. Of course, I listen to concious rappers, political rappers, abstract rappers, but I'm not going to deny the huge influence and huge part of the culture that Paul Wall raps about. That's just stupid.


There you go, that's completely different. I don't deny it either, I just don't respect it, it's not why I listen to hiphop. It isn't something I want to see other people buy into either. Making money and bragging about how many bitches you get shouldn't be what we as a human race are going for, and music influences everyone, and that's not what I want to hear. But maybe it's what you want to hear, and I can respect that, but I'll never respect a culture bent on pertuating capitalistic ideas that only deal in money and the desensitization of sex to millions of young adults a day. Though I do see, in the very near future, more people realizing the possibilites of the human mind, and the lack of innovation that sort of rap/hiphop brings to it.

#44 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:18 AM

Hip-hop is different things to different people, there is no "real" hip-hop. It's a broad genre with all different styles and mentalities and there's room for everyone. Neither of you are right, and neither of you are wrong.

But the thread is about MADLIB

So if you two are gonna continue comparing penis sizes and crying about who's the realest hip-hop head why don't you do it via pm.

#45 !!!

!!!

    Frances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1125 posts
  • Joined 07-April 05
  • Location:Phila.

Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:34 AM

^ Owned.
Just curious since I haven't heard it yet, but which is better: The Unseen, or the Futher Adventures?

#46 and_ACTiON

and_ACTiON

    '05 FO LYFE!!!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5669 posts
  • Joined 18-July 05
  • Gender:Female

Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:41 AM

I heard "ghetto zone" by madlib. and it's tiightt.

#47 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 29 June 2006 - 11:41 AM

^ Owned.
Just curious since I haven't heard it yet, but which is better: The Unseen, or the Futher Adventures?


"The Unseen," is more accessible so it might be a better place to start. The hardest thing for most people to get over with Quasimoto are the vocals, but once you get used to them it all sort of starts to take shape.

"Further Adventures," is just as good, but it might be a bit challenging for some because it's not so straight forward, but if you like "the Unseen" i definetly recommend moving up to "The Further Adventures."

#48 !!!

!!!

    Frances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1125 posts
  • Joined 07-April 05
  • Location:Phila.

Posted 29 June 2006 - 12:29 PM

Ha. The vocals are my favorite part. I've only heard "Greenery" off of further adventures, but I like it. So I guess I'll get that one too. Thanks.

#49 AlSirat

AlSirat

    thats how im livin

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8809 posts
  • Joined 10-March 05
  • Location:raleighwood, NC

Posted 29 June 2006 - 03:37 PM

Man, straight up fuck that. It's absurd that you guys can sit around demeaning my opinion of hiphop, while some of you seem to like an MC who perpetuates everything that is wrong in hiphop and rap. Paul Wall raps about money, bling, and "the game". That shit's ludicrous, writing songs about how expensive the grills are in your teeth is exactly the sort of shit I despise from rappers. for the mere fact that those sam diamonds are coming from African slave-labor, and any true MC, especially black ones would understand how fucke up the diamond trade is.

Talk about fucking generalizations, "All good rappers are black." "No white rapper has ever been good. Fact."

You guys are straight whack.

we have actually heard lots of black and white rappers though. its not just generalizing when you've heard all that the backpacker white guys have to offer.

and mahmud and the others have heard alot more rap than me

#50 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 17 August 2006 - 10:57 AM

Madlib Tour Dates:

Aug 23 2006 8:00P Brasilintime in Germany
Sep 1 2006 8:00P Great American Music Hall San Francisco, CA
Sep 13 2006 8:00P Japan DJ Tour Sapporo
Sep 16 2006 8:00P Japan DJ Tour Fukuoka
Sep 17 2006 8:00P Japan DJ Tour Osaka
Sep 20 2006 8:00P Air (DJ) Tokyo
Sep 22 2006 8:00P Air (DJ) Tokyo
Oct 1 2006 8:00P Voorit (DJ) Gent
Oct 3 2006 8:00P Paradiso (DJ) Amsterdam
Oct 5 2006 8:00P Koko (MC) London
Oct 6 2006 8:00P St. Sauveur (DJ) Paris
Oct 8 2006 8:00P Wardrobe (DJ) Leeds
Oct 13 2006 8:00P Ex Plx Los Angeles, CA
Oct 19 2006 8:00P Mezzanine San Francisco, CA
Oct 20 2006 8:00P Berbatis Pan Portland, OR
Oct 21 2006 8:00P Richards on Richards Vancouver, B.C.
Oct 22 2006 8:00P Neumos Seattle, WA
Oct 24 2006 8:00P Urban Lounge SLC, UT
Oct 25 2006 8:00P Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom Denver, CO
Oct 27 2006 8:00P Triple Rock Minneapolis, MN
Oct 28 2006 8:00P Metro Chicago, IL
Oct 29 2006 8:00P Magic Stick Detroit , MI
Oct 30 2006 8:00P Phoenix Concert Theater Toronto
Oct 31 2006 8:00P Le National Montreal
Nov 1 2006 8:00P Paradise Boston, MA
Nov 2 2006 8:00P BB Kings New York, NY
Nov 4 2006 8:00P Starlite Philadelphia, PA
Nov 5 2006 8:00P Sonar Baltimore, MD


New Madvillain track off the upcoming Stones Throw album "Chrome Children"

Madvillain - Monkey Suite

#51 villalobos

villalobos

    buzzy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13345 posts
  • Joined 01-July 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:from the internet

Posted 17 August 2006 - 11:02 AM

Posted Image

ftw

#52 pixiesfanyo

pixiesfanyo

    Tetragrammaton Cleric

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3979 posts
  • Joined 03-April 04
  • Location:Idyllwild, CA
  • Interests:Bass Guitar, Music, Film Making, Poetry and Song Writing

Posted 17 August 2006 - 11:22 AM

I picked it up on WAXXX

#53 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 03 October 2006 - 09:43 AM

I just got Madlib's "Mind Fusion 3" off Indie Torrents, and it's very very good. He throws a lot of Brazilian music in this one to go along with the jazz, reggae, and soul that were more prevolent on Mind Fusion Vol.1 and 2. I kinda wish they had spilt the release into multiple tracks, but that's only a small complaint.

I'll be sharing it on soulseek if anyone's interested.

#54 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 05 October 2006 - 06:19 AM

Here's a new article I figured I'd post. It's pretty informative for those that aren't already familiar with Madlib's music.


Madlib: Divided Soul
by Hua Hsu


If there is a lesson to be gleaned from Garth Brooks' blink-length stint as the angst-riddled, soul-patched rocker Chris Gaines, it is that alter egos generally signal corny reinvention. Few artists realize until it's too late that all the riches in the world cannot restore the simplicity of the anonymous life, or the expectations-free stage name. Oxnard, California, hip-hop artist Otis Jackson, Jr., aka Madlib, understands this perhaps too well. Far from a household name, Jackson's profile stands in inverse relation to his reputation as a producer: the more praise heaped upon his work, the more elusive he seems to become, splintering off into a million little alter egos, with his only connection to the world being those bizarre sounds that waft from his soundlab with frightening regularity.

Jackson was born in 1973 in Oakland, California, the son of two musicians. His father was a session singer notable for his work with David Axelrod and H.B. Barnum, while his uncle is Jon Faddis, a trumpeter who has gigged with Dizzy Armstrong, Charles Mingus and Bob James. As a youngster growing up in Oxnard — a sleepy town on the outskirts of Los Angeles where members of the Beat Junkies also grew up — there was little to do but make (and obsess over) music. (Jackson's younger brother, Oh No, is also a respected beat-maker.) In 1990, Jackson founded the group the Lootpack with friends DJ Romes and Wildchild, and he did some beats for the Alkaholiks.

Anyone who has ever tried interviewing Jackson understands that his reticence isn't an act; each minute away from his records and studio seems to be a truly taxing experience. He gives the impression that he knows little of what goes on in the world, other than that it exists somewhere outside the doors of his studio. The ever-regressing fashions of modern hip-hop interest him even less. Someone from Jackson's label, Stones Throw Records, once suggested that the best way to go about extracting information from him was just to strike up a conversation about jazz, and nod along to his ever-insightful meanderings.

In the late '90s, though, little distinguished Madlib’s geeky style from the dozens of other crate-digging producers toiling in the independent scene. That changed in 1999, when the Lootpack released their first album, Soundpieces: Da Antidote. Greeted with great acclaim, the album’s loose, spaced-out feel and quirky beats signaled a refinement of Madlib’s technique. Buried deep amongst the dusty odes to weed (the incredible “Weededed”) and outbursts of crew love (“Episodes,” “Likwit Fusion”) was a befuddling, “fresh, like douche” gem called “Answers,” featuring a helium-pitched hypeman-slash-sidekick named Quasimoto. Many thought it a gimmick, but when Jackson released a full Quasimoto album the following year—titled The Unseen —it was clear that he had sort of given up caring what anyone thought about him.

If beauty is in the eye of its beholder, then I'd be very interested in whatever it is that Jackson smokes when he makes his records. The Unseen stands as one of the more intriguing hip-hop records of the past decade. Along with its follow-up, 2005's Further Adventures of Lord Quas, the Quasimoto records seem to find Jackson allowing a glimpse into his exceedingly cluttered mind, all squiggly, near-unfinished short-attention-span beats and child-like, cuss-filled rhymes. Songs whirr to life mid-beat or feature spirited arguments with Melvin Van Peebles' sampled barbs ("Hydrant Game," "Bartender Say"), while others consist of little more than laundry-lists of Jackson's favorite musicians ("Jazz Cats, Pt. 1," "Rappcats, Pt. 3"). Much of it doesn't sound like music at all, instead conveying thoughts in motion, ideas being sketched on a drawing board, scratched out, scrapped and then approached again.

The following year, Jackson formed Yesterdays New Quintet, a fuzzy electronic jazz combo consisting of a few grizzled, battle-worn — and wholly invented — session players. It was as though side-project alter egos couldn't suffice; even Jackson's fake band needed fake names, each with fake back-stories. Aspiring for the tastier and funkier moments of mid-'70s jazz-fusion, YNQ evolved into a space for Jackson to practice his hand at composing music. Keeping with the ruse, "band members" Malik Flowers, Joe McDuphrey and Monk Hughes (the excellent homage to oft-sampled jazz-funk keyboardist Weldon Irvine, A Tribute to Brother Weldon) have each cut solo material. All this, predictably, spawned an entirely new side project, last year's Sound Directions record The Funky Side of Life. Sound Directions represented a rare moment: an actual collaboration between Madlib and other human beings, including actual people who play in real-life bands like the Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings, Antibalas and Breakestra. Having dabbled in the sounds of old, Jackson turned his attention toward an ambitious, futuristic and distinctly British take on jazz virtuosity. One of the odder records in the Jackson catalogue is 2004's Theme for a Broken Soul, his — or rather, DJ Rels' — attempt at making a record in the relentlessly percussive, twitchy style of broken-beat. Probably Jackson's most dance-floor-friendly record, it's nonetheless an acquired taste.

Despite being, in the context of hip-hop, a bit of a recluse, Jackson's latest and best records have been collaborations. In 2003, he and the late Detroit producer J Dilla fused as Jaylib, mailing vocals and beats back and forth and emerging with one of the year's better records, Champion Sound. The following year, Jackson and rapper/producer MF Doom attempted to out-weird each other on the Madvillain record, Madvillainy. And this year, Madlib and friend Dudley Perkins put out Expressions (2012 a.u.), a classic bit of stoned, post-D'Angelo soul.

Stones Throw has issued the instrumental versions of the last two. Like the best instrumental records from the RZA or DJ Premier, Madvillainy Instrumentals and Dudley Perkins "Expressions" Instrumentals sound and feel like completely new releases — the textures and accidentally-happened-upon loops are more vivid when scrubbed of vocals, and the odd, barely-there inertia of his rhythms takes on new life without the anchor of a rapper.

There is another Jackson record on the shelves right now: The Art of Love, featuring beats from Madlib. But this is Otis Jackson, Sr. — the father of Madlib and Oh No and the financier for Lootpack's first record (some of which is collected on The Lost Tapes). Most of the eldest Jackson's comeback record is straight-ahead R&B for the grown folks, but the kids supply a few remixes. It's a father-son game that puts loyalty and love over what sounds fashionable. It can be a bit unnerving hearing Jackson's velvety, occasionally over-the-top croon atop Madlib and Oh No's smoked-out, bottom-heavy wobblers, but you can tell none of them care — and it's a beautiful thing.


source: http://www.emusic.co...282_200609.html

#55 Nixon08

Nixon08

    Ilyena

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3446 posts
  • Joined 03-April 05
  • Location:Baltimore

Posted 05 October 2006 - 07:47 AM

This is my first time reading this thread, and boy does it have me riled up. I disagree with everyone involved (minus Stalk and Hottnikkels who spoke objectively and avoided ignorance all together) in the earlier argument as to whether black or white MC's are better.

As was mentioned before, it depends on what hip hop means to YOU. All this "white emcees are better because they don't rap about the streets" and "no white emcee has ever been good/hip hop IS rapping about money" is total garbage.

I respect all of your opinions (especially those regularly take part in the hip hop forum) but that whole argument almost made me sick.

I realize this is not the Hip Hop forum, so I'll keep my argument as brief as I possibly can. Actually, I'll say three things:

A. Although the color of your skin has absolutely nothing to do with rap talent, blacks invented the style. Any white rapper, any latino rapper, any asian rapper, no matter what their skill level, will always be borrowing from blacks. But that's the same as saying Led Zeppelin is the greatest rock band of all time because they invented heavy rock. It's stupid and irrellivant.

B. Hip Hop isn't about fucking money. If that's what it means to you, then fine - thats your prergative. But, the founders of the art were not concerned in the least with taunting their riches. They didn't even have any. Rap made ZERO cash back in the day, so where the hell does that statement come from, anyways? Yes, you can rap about money, drugs, whatever and put out a great album - you could name a million emcees who've done that. But it's not the content nearly as much as it is the delivery, storytelling, and production.

C. It's ironic, seeing as how this is a Madlib thread, that all those involved in this rediculous argument completely forget about instrumental hip hop (i.e. Madlib, Shadow, RJD2) etc. Plenty of white AND black artists have created instrumental masterpeices.

I should have put this in the hip hop forum, but the argument was here.

Anyways, probably more than any other artist out there, I'd love the chance to meet Madlib. I'm so insanely intrigued buy his work ethic. How does he consistantly put out album after album after album, and have each and every one take on different identities and forms, while adopting new concepts all the time. He's a fucking maniac.

#56 hottnikkels

hottnikkels

    *****

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7911 posts
  • Joined 07-December 03
  • Location:Lexington One, Two, Five - The Big Apple
  • Interests:Art, Girls, Music

Posted 05 October 2006 - 05:45 PM

I pretty much agree with all of that, and I also agree that Madlib is a maniac. From what I've read it seems that he hardly ever leaves the studio, and even when he does he always takes portable recording equipment with him.

Here's a shot of his setup while he was living in Brazil. Believe it or not, but this (a portable record player, an SP 303 and a borrowed cassette deck) is all that he used to make some of the tracks on Madvillian.

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#57 Nixon08

Nixon08

    Ilyena

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3446 posts
  • Joined 03-April 05
  • Location:Baltimore

Posted 06 October 2006 - 03:36 AM

Believe it or not, but this (a portable record player, an SP 303 and a borrowed cassette deck) is all that he used to make some of the tracks on Madvillian.



Ha! Thats fucking crazy. Goes to show what a true artist he is. Talk about turning water into wine.

#58 3flip

3flip

    Miranda

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 348 posts
  • Joined 30-April 05

Posted 06 October 2006 - 04:04 AM

"Most of the MC's I've heard"

Murs is chill I guess, "Anneurysm" the cut on Felt is fucking amazing, but, again, that's with a white MC.

Also, in my opinion, AesRock is the best MC on Def Jux.

And fuck that man you can't be "wrong" about an opinion on music or anything else for that matter, it's all relative, so what you said is ignorant.


slug is african and native american

#59 ELEPHANTe

ELEPHANTe

    Frances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1224 posts
  • Joined 03-August 06
  • Location:Niger

Posted 06 October 2006 - 05:55 AM

madlib 4 president

#60 Damo_Suzuki

Damo_Suzuki

    Televator

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 154 posts
  • Joined 08-September 05
  • Location:Birmingham, UK
  • Interests:Pwnage<br />Avant garde music<br />Conforming to anti-conformity<br />Hip hop
  • Myspace

Posted 06 October 2006 - 08:14 AM

The term "fag nigga bullshit" comes to mind here...

It's all about the Mobb, the Wu, Snoop, SmIf-N-wEsSuN, Jeru The Damaja, NaS, Dr. Dre, Biggie Smalls, Eazy Motherfuckin' E, Capone n Noreaga, Ice Cube, Da Lench Mob, Organized Konfusion, Heltah Skeltah, Boot Camp Clik, Warren G, Nate Dogg, The D.O.C., Ice-T, Too $hort, Tha Alkaholikz, AZ etc etc




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users